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meanwhile on the road disc brake front
Last Post 06/04/2014 09:45 PM by Mike Shea. 58 Replies.
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Ride On

Posts:416

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04/30/2014 05:25 PM
Interesting read about disc brakes and pro teams

http://www.bikeradar.com/us/gear/article/the-problem-with-disc-brakes-in-road-racing-is-40867/
Master50

Posts:217

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05/01/2014 08:49 PM
Posted By Keith Jackson on 04/30/2014 03:05 PM
Yes, but keep in mind the final limiting factor in braking is not the brakes but the contact patch. Once you have the ability to lock up your wheels with one finger, what's the point of having more?


Disk brakes are not appreciably stronger than very good callipers. They all can lock a front wheel up. What disks allow is better modulation, predictability, fade resistance and work better in the wet than rim brakes. They can allow a skilled rider an advantage in late braking or threshold braking in many more conditions of use and regardless of rim material. They can give a person an advantage say on a switch back descent. No one is suggesting road bikes need more ultimate stopping power. Under many dry conditions cantilever brakes met most braking needs on MTBs. V Brakes were better but disk brakes are the only system that does braking duty in all MTB conditions. My rims needed replacing every 2 years. Brake blocks could go from new to I aint stopping in an hour of muddy riding. These things are not so common on the road as even after a wet winter I would kill only 1 set of brake pads. My nucleon wheels need new rims. $400.00 later I am thinking disks and pads are cheaper than this over the same period of time.
Keith Richards

Posts:701

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05/02/2014 11:11 AM
http://www.cyclingnews.com/features/the-problem-with-disc-brakes-in-road-racing-is

Interesting article on what the mechanics and pros think of road disc brakes at the elite level of the sport.
----- It is his word versus ours. We like our word. We like where we stand and we like our credibility."--Lance Armstrong.
ChinookPass

Posts:406

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05/02/2014 11:41 AM
Looks like folks in the industry have been reading the VN forum!
Hoshie

Posts:111

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05/03/2014 01:43 PM
Well, to clarify, when I say stop better, it means a few things:

1) Appropriately strong; had lackluster experience with a few modern cantilevers which caused me to move to V brakes on my cross bike.
2) Less prone to fluctuation in changing conditions like rain, etc
3) Good modulation. Vs, for example, are very on / off when using a road style shifter. Discs I have tried seem better in that regard which I would enjoy on either a cross or road bike.

Of course, we can all say that if you have enough power to lock up your brakes, you have enough. That is true in one sense, but it's a one dimensional way to think about the problem.

I think with any new thing, there are considerations as the article suggests. It's a longer list than something like di2 for example. Everything you guys mentioned.

We'll see if it makes it.

For me, the advantages are not so large that it's a must have, but given what I want from my next bike, it's something I'd be interested in especially if it opens up the ability to run 28s or 30s on a still racy frame / fork combo.

I can get that now with a few bikes, but I suspect if we move to discs en masse, we'll have more to choose from in road / cross type applications that fit the way I like to ride. There are some custom builders doing those types of bikes now, and I find it interesting as I consider my next bike purchase independent of what the pro racing community wind up doing.

j



Master50

Posts:217

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05/04/2014 01:33 PM
I might add easier to fit fenders too. Given the current stable, I cannot imagine upgrades in the next 10 years so the next bike will be a Tandem and it will have disk brakes and with my recent experience with my new MTB I want through axels too. My wife is in the market for a winter bike and maybe her bike will be disk braked. Seems like a good choice for wet weather bike.
Ride On

Posts:416

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05/04/2014 05:31 PM
Was just looking at one of those crotch rocket bikes, one of my daughters friends has one, and it has dual larger disc brakes on the front and a smaller single disc on the back.
vtguy

Posts:222

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05/05/2014 11:34 AM
Love them on my MT bike and would seriously consider them for a new cross bike...but for my road bike, I just don't see the need. My Ultegra brakes work just fine.
Keith Richards

Posts:701

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05/05/2014 12:04 PM
The only time I might appreciate disc would be in a serious rain. I had to ride home in a downpour and I have to admit, the amount of time it takes to get standard calipers to start to grab can seem to be FOREVER when you are in traffic.
----- It is his word versus ours. We like our word. We like where we stand and we like our credibility."--Lance Armstrong.
Orange Crush

Posts:1149

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05/05/2014 12:11 PM
Everything seems to be pointing to it being a matter of when not if we'll see discs in pro peleton and the market in general.

The main question seems to be how long it will take to come up with a uniform standard and how long it will take for manufacturers that don't have their act together to bring a road disc offering complying with that standard.

Any takers as to how many years we're looking at? We can argue all day long about the pros and cons of discs but given that this seems to be a done deal we might as well look at a question that matters.
79pmooney

Posts:1025

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05/05/2014 12:16 PM
My question on disc brakes for road racing at the pro level is this: Do the seconds gained on descents from superior braking offset the near guaranteed occasionally skewed results as a result of a slow wheel change to a key leader. Current wheel changes are about as fast and reliable as similar repair work in any racing sport with mechanical equipment.

Also, do better brakes make things safer in the real world? Riders in large numbers approaching hairpins a lot faster because they now can? Given that they are competitive humans, is this a good idea? Of course they will say yes. So will fans wanting to see a spectacle. But should a responsible racing organization go there?

Ben, a Luddite who knows there are boxes you can open but not close
THE SKINNY

Posts:343

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05/05/2014 12:16 PM
the trek domane is going to be offered with disks. it can support some beefy tires so it will work for gravel.
How we spend our days is, of course, how we spend our lives.
Ride On

Posts:416

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05/05/2014 05:57 PM
Interesting comment in the article I never thought of is what will it be like when the pro teams all convert but the continental teams haven't due to budget constraints ?

Some guys are screaming into a turn and some aren't, what happens then
Keith Richards

Posts:701

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06/03/2014 10:07 AM

So there ya go.
----- It is his word versus ours. We like our word. We like where we stand and we like our credibility."--Lance Armstrong.
6ix

Posts:113

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06/03/2014 10:51 AM
You know, I didn't think about continental and domestic racing. I was just thinking about how the UCI would need to demand ALL teams use discs rather than having a mix throughout the peloton. That would cause a lot of problems if some riders are able to dive-bomb hairpin descents while others have to scrape away speed leading into turns. The pro peloton is a very small group and is comparatively simple to manage. But if amateurs start showing up with discs while most still have rim brakes, that's really going to be bad.
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