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carbon or aluminum
Last Post 05/11/2014 10:48 PM by Hoshie S. 22 Replies.
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Cosmic Kid

Posts:988

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05/11/2014 08:40 AM
Yes, complete bikes are (almost) always cheaper.

Steel is a great material, but like everything else, has drawbacks. Heavier, can rust, not as stiff on a pound / stiffness ratio, etc.

Personally, I think the best "bang for your buck" option is well-designed aluminum frame. The CAAD 10 from C-Dale or the New Specialized Allez are great bikes.
Just say "NO!" to WCP!!!!
Orange Crush

Posts:1149

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05/11/2014 11:46 AM
Posted By Cosmic Kid on 05/11/2014 08:40 AM
Yes, complete bikes are (almost) always cheaper.

Orbea has (or at least used to have) a very cost effective offering to "build your own bike": pick frame, then wheels and components, great for mix and match. This is how I got mine.
Hoshie

Posts:111

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05/11/2014 02:07 PM
If it is the same frame geometry, then I'd say it is budget driven decision. I' d set ultegra as your group benchmark though. That stuff is excellent.

Also, wheels and tires count more than most people think.

j
zootracer

Posts:264

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05/11/2014 02:10 PM
I agree build up bikes are cheaper. If you find one that has the right handlebar width, stem length and angle, decent wheelset and so on.

I don't think Orbea has that program any longer. I could not find anything online about it.

What is the price limit for the original poster?

The only major prob I had with built up bikes is a lot of the wheels are cra*. But that's just me.

Hoshie

Posts:111

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05/11/2014 02:14 PM
Lastly, I love steel and am choosing a custom steel frame soon. But, for an off the shelf frame, carbon or aluminum frames with the right geo for you all make great bikes.

This assumption that steel or Ti doesnt break is just off the mark. I have seen steel frames crack near weld areas, etc. So, I take all the examples of this or that material to be better as anecdotal unless the design was poor. For example, early cervelo carbon frames had a manufacturing issue near the bb, but that wouldn't stop me from riding a new cervelo as they are excellent frames.


J
THE SKINNY

Posts:343

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05/11/2014 04:21 PM
the price point is in the neighborhood of 2K. the aluminum frame i have now is really pretty comfortable as far as ride quality, it just doesn't fit very well. it was a free 1999 cannondale 1000 with ultegra parts and a carbon fork. i've had it a few years and about 3 hours is all i can stand. i've got the saddle position set but the bar and stem i'm stuck with. i would love a steel/ti frame but it would have to be custom and i don't want to pay that much. the defy has a tall head tube and a short top tube. i guess all the major manufacturers have a frame like that but my local giant shop will probably hook me up nicely. i don't race either and i get the impression that the nicer aluminum frames are set up more for going fast.
How we spend our days is, of course, how we spend our lives.
zootracer

Posts:264

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05/11/2014 05:08 PM
If you're set on the al Defy and if your LBS will help you with the fit, go for it. I rode an al Klein for years and I found it extremely comfortable. Gave it up as it was too large for me. The only thing I would check on is Giant's warranty on the al frame.
Hoshie

Posts:111

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05/11/2014 10:48 PM
If you can get the right fit, that sounds like a good situation as giant typically makes good product.
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