Dream fulfilled, check. Next?
Last Post 09/11/2013 04:38 PM by entheo genic. 7 Replies.
Author Messages
ChinookPass

Posts:285

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09/11/2013 12:05 PM
This seems unfathomable to me. Stopping at 25 at the top of your game. Plenty of time to sit behind a desk when you are 35. I think I'd take a few months off and reconsider if I were Veilleux. http://www.cyclingnews.com/news/dav...retirement
Keith Richards

Posts:527

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09/11/2013 12:14 PM
I think he is being very reasonable. He knows what is required to maintain the top level (HINT), and obviously is not willing to do what is necessary to stay where he is physically.

I appreciate his honesty.
----- It is his word versus ours. We like our word. We like where we stand and we like our credibility."--Lance Armstrong.
ChinookPass

Posts:285

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09/11/2013 01:07 PM
I do respect his decision and get what you are saying but he has had success, worked for years to get where he is, and given that cyclists peak at 27-28, might as well stick it out a few more years before hanging it up. I'm not in his shoes though. The doping thing complicates everything doesn't it?
Keith Richards

Posts:527

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09/11/2013 01:44 PM
The doping thing is big. But also...let's be honest. Anybody here who has had some success knows how much you gotta work to get it done. I can only imagine how much work it takes to get done what he accomplished. I cannot blame him for leaving now, on a high note, as opposed to possibly never winning another event ever while working just as hard as he worked this year. He leaves now, gets his professional career going and in 10-15 years he can tell his kids how he was a top class pro and won a few races "back in his crazy younger days."
----- It is his word versus ours. We like our word. We like where we stand and we like our credibility."--Lance Armstrong.
jmdirt

Posts:468

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09/11/2013 02:56 PM
Chinook,

While I will be questioning your statement, I am am only responding because I hear that false statement too often. Traditionally cyclist "peaked" in their mid 20s because after that they had families and couldn't support their families on cycling money. It had nothing to do with physical peaks and/or declines. Physically there is no reason that an endurance athlete can't be at the top until their endocrine levels drop. While that is different for everyone, 40 is not out of the question. Plus, the science of training and nutrition have improved greatly over the past 20 years. That alone could add 5-10 years to a career. Add in that pro cyclist race less days now and 40 is realistic. Other factors like when they started racing, injuries, mental stability, family demands... all play into this as well. Yes, doping is a factor ? mark in pro sports but that doesn't mean that every 30+ year old racer who gets a result "must be on dope because they are past their peak". I could go on...
Good luck to DV!
Orange Crush

Posts:840

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09/11/2013 03:04 PM
I think he's simply doing the math and you're overlooking the most important part in the article "and start a family". What can I guy like him make in the pro peleton? For how much longer can he make that until it's game over?Then what, is it good enough for retirement, to support the family? Or is it simply better to cut the cord now and pursue a career that he knows will bring in a good wage for a long time. Not very exciting or adventuristic, just realistic, HE'S ALREADY THINKING LIKE AN ENGINEER.

nightfend

Posts:48

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09/11/2013 04:34 PM
I think sometimes people forget pros have almost no freetime throughout the year. They are basically either training or racing and are travelling most of the year. Pretty hard to establish relationships or families under those conditions. Some do it, but I would believe it must put a lot of pressure on the spouses to take care of most things.
Entheo

Posts:299

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09/11/2013 04:38 PM
it bears reminding that professional cycling comes from very humble roots; coal miners and ditch diggers with nothing to lose and a lot to gain turning themselves inside out on a bicycle. most of the anonymous peloton who hangs around until they're in their mid-thirties have the prospect of opening up a bike shop or a bar, hopefully with a couple jerseys on the wall from the couple of glory days they had during their career.

OC & KR are right, this guy is a logical, rational, mature thinker who knows that if he waits too long to start a technical career he'll be passed over for the younger guys willing to put in 60 hours a week on an intern's income.


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