My new rig
Last Post 04/18/2014 08:45 PM by SideBy Side. 23 Replies.
Author Messages
SideBySide

Posts:191

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04/12/2014 10:34 PM
I finally got a new handcycle: [URL=http://s651.photobucket.com/user/JerryLamb/media/DSC_0271.jpg.html][/URL]
huckleberry

Posts:247

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04/12/2014 10:53 PM
Sweet!

Aluminum? What does that weigh?
SideBySide

Posts:191

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04/12/2014 11:18 PM
Yes, and I am not sure. It's not a super light.

I went for a short ride today, and realized that I don't use the primary muscles often. It'll take a while to get in shape.
Gonzo Cyclist

Posts:238

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04/13/2014 12:01 AM
that's an amazing looking piece of machinery, very cool!! looks like fun!! Just take it day by day, side by side, you will get there soon enough
SideBySide

Posts:191

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04/13/2014 12:09 AM
Taking it slow is not my strength.
79pmooney

Posts:1192

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04/13/2014 01:11 AM
Side by, I finally get your moniker. Took me a while!

I watched the chairs precede the runners by many minutes at the Dexter-Ann Arbor 1/2 marathon mid '80s. A revelation for me. They were on "standard" wheelchairs, but 20 lb chairs with wheels that looked like bike race wheels. At the time I had a friend who knew she would have the surgery that would take her from crutches to a chair in a few years. 7 years later, the surgery happened. I spent a weekend with her 10 days after she left the hospital and got to watch her start her new life in a chair, a custom sport chair roughly the weight of the chair I witnessed. Also got to watch this woman, an athlete in her youth and fighter, struggle to go up a 20' vertical ramp, stopping twice and needing everything she had to get started each time. I immediately thought bikes. "This is someone riding a fix gear in too big a gear. I've done that." Next thought - why not an internally geared hub, like the 3 speeds I rode when I was 12.

That led to me working with 4 U of Wash students to invent a hub to do that. They came up with a working mock-up, we patented it, then the engineer who took the ultrasonic toothbrush patent to the SoniCare took on our patent and eventually to MagicWheels. Seriously cool. I got to wheel around the trade show they debuted at for a couple of days! Unfortunately, their timing was gawd-awful, like just before the market fell apart and they never got the start they deserved. Now the company is struggling and I see their website is down but the wheels are seriously cool. I hope they come back.

Ben
Ride On

Posts:454

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04/13/2014 07:02 AM
Needs some carbon fiber or it's not a real bike. Ha ha ha

Nice looking ride
ChinookPass

Posts:494

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04/16/2014 01:13 PM
SideBySide, what's your story. How long have you been handcycling?
SideBySide

Posts:191

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04/16/2014 06:36 PM
This is my first handcycle. I lived down a narrow, two lane, hilly, twisty road for the previous 17 years. Considering the speed and "quality" of most drivers on the road, I was unwilling to be on it without a bunch of steel around me. My wife and I have since moved to a road that has a bike lane and access to trails, Kenmore for those in the area.

This is the first post I have made, in either VN, that stated my condition, I just used it as my screen name as a joke. The only people who knew were they guys I met for a beer.
I've been a cycling fan since high school. I've been an L1 paraplegic since '81, after drinking too much and falling off a cliff while in college.


Ben, I think you posted that in the past. It's a great idea.
THE SKINNY

Posts:430

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04/16/2014 08:36 PM
get used to dropping people. those hand cycles are impossible to keep up with. a guy caught up with me on a charity ride on one of those. he wasn't sure he was on the correct route. we chatted for a bit until he got his bearings then he was gone.
How we spend our days is, of course, how we spend our lives.
Cosmic Kid

Posts:1192

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04/16/2014 08:51 PM
I love bike pjorn!!

Great looking rig, SbS! Glad you were finally able to live in a place where you could get one.

Just out of curiosity, have you used racing chairs in the past and decided to take the hand-cycle plunge after you moved?
Just say "NO!" to WCP!!!!
SideBySide

Posts:191

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04/16/2014 08:53 PM
I am fairly upright at the moment and my speed is fairly slow, but we'll see as I get into shape.
longslowdistance

Posts:745

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04/16/2014 09:46 PM
Great thread, thank you Side by Side.

Regarding your new rig, I know very little about handcycles. Can you give us more details? Are those Conti tires? Phil hubs?
Love the disc brakes (incoming!)
79pmooney

Posts:1192

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04/16/2014 10:09 PM
lsd, Phil Wood has been making wheelchair hubs a long time. I have no idea what is considered "hot" now, but if you were wheeling around on Phils 20 years ago, you were rolling in style. And if you want hubs that are never going to leave you stranded, is there better than Phil?

Ben
SideBySide

Posts:191

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04/16/2014 10:20 PM
Yes, Phil wood hubs, conti tires, Mavic wheels, Shimano brakes, crankset, cassette. It's a FreedomRyder. I wanted something with better ground clearance than most racing models. I think the disc will work well, all force is on my right hand. I am a little worried that I'll run out of gear, but I'll address that if necessary.
Inferno7

Posts:280

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04/17/2014 08:31 AM
Amazing machine. Nothing like a new ride!
Keith Richards

Posts:759

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04/17/2014 08:58 AM
Humbling...you are a hard dude SideBySide.
----- It is his word versus ours. We like our word. We like where we stand and we like our credibility."--Lance Armstrong.
SideBySide

Posts:191

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04/17/2014 12:27 PM
No, you just do what you have to do. If you love cars, you find a way to race them. If you love cycling, you find a way to enjoy that. I firmly believe that anyone here would do the same, because of the personalities we have. The people who would sit around and do nothing would have been doing that before.
Sweet Milk

Posts:93

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04/18/2014 11:30 AM
I am a complete ignoramus when it comes to this, so please bear with me - Looking at the picture it occurred to me that the cranks on the handcycles that I have seen are always in-phase (is that the reason for being called side by side?) rather than 180 degrees out of phase as with road bikes - are there people that prefer another set-up? Is the reason that otherwise the upper body would have to rock too much? Does this set-up allow you to use your core muscles efficiently instead of primarily having to use your arm strength?

SideBySide

Posts:191

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04/18/2014 01:27 PM
The name SideBySide came from the configuration of my wheelchair wheels, not the handcycle.

I "think" the primary reasons for the cranks being together is for balance and to give an even strong stroke. If they were on opposite sides, your left shoulder would be pulled forward at the bottom of the stroke while your right was pushed back at the top. The bulk of the power, in my limited experience so far, is on the push stroke. All racing chairs that I have seen use this configuration, even for people with high function.
79pmooney

Posts:1192

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04/18/2014 02:27 PM
Does anyone use a strap across their shoulders or torso to allow a stronger pull? Functioning a little like a toestrap?

Ben
Sweet Milk

Posts:93

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04/18/2014 04:01 PM
Thanks for the answers SideBySide. Looking further at the picture it also occurs to me that it must be difficult to engineer a good steering geometry - I assume that the basket like loops near the front wheel is where your feet are placed? So when you steer your legs are moved over? I can imagine that going downhill at speed coming into a turn may be an, let's say, exhilarating experience...

In any case - it looks like a blast to ride.
Sweet Milk

Posts:93

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04/18/2014 05:09 PM
@79pmooney: since apparently the push stroke is where most power is generated a strap would hinder more than help. But then again, I may be full of it...
SideBySide

Posts:191

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04/18/2014 08:45 PM
I think people lean back to reduce drag, then the weight of the torso is enough to get a good pull stroke. It is a surprisingly smooth stroke.

The turning radius sucks, in all cycles, AFAIK, It takes most of a two lane road.


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