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Skinny's post and doing the right thing
Last Post 07/03/2014 03:51 PM by j t. 10 Replies.
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79pmooney

Posts:1026

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07/02/2014 11:21 PM
On the cell phone thread Skinny posted

"my cousin comes over from texas for vacation. she brings her bike which is a neighborhood cruiser. she's a chunky monkey and unhealthy but she had been riding a little bit every day. she wanted me to take her on a nice ride so we rode out at the beach out to the fort, about 10 miles round trip. we're riding and chatting having a good time. her phone goes off so she stops to answer it. at first i'm a little miffed but she keeps talking. after about 5 minutes i signal to her i've got to take a leak so i sprint ahead fuming the whole way. i come out of the restroom to see her back to riding. i pull up next to her and she says she's sorry, she had to answer. it was her doctor's office calling to make sure she's getting enough exercise, eating right and feeling good due to her diabetes. she gets a break on her insurance if she follows the rules."

I've been thinking recently that when I see overweight, outta shape folk on bikes, instead of blasting past feeling far superior, I should be calling out encouragement or giving them a thumb's up.  That when I reach those pearly gates, being able to say I helped A and B get on bikes, rejuvenate their lives and stave off certain heart attack (A and B being loved ones) might not be enough.  St Peter knows I blasted past that fatso who then gave up his venture into biking and had a massive heart attack three years later.  (And yes, I was just one of the many cyclists who did the same thing to him.  But I have done that many times.  I am probably responsible for being someone's last straw.

If I want to live responsibly, I have to think beyond myself and try to be an inspiration to those I never want to be.  (No, I don't believe in that afterlife stuff.  I believe we are rewarded in the here and now for what we do.)

Ben
huckleberry

Posts:215

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07/03/2014 09:17 AM
Thanks, Ben.

Good thoughts.
Cosmic Kid

Posts:988

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07/03/2014 09:36 AM
Yeah, I've long since gone from scoffing at overweight people on bikes to thinking "good for them."

I saw a really overweight woman last weekend on a really nice Specialized Shiv with all the gear on it. Sure, there is no way she is fast, but she is out there trying to improve herself. If buying an expensive bike helps her do that, have at it.

Not saying I don't have to catch myself from the occasional snarky thought, but I'm working on it.

I don't believe any of us are responsible for others giving up the sport.....that responsibility lies with the individual. But a friendly wave, nod or "good morning, nice day!" can go a long way towards helping others feel accepted.
Just say "NO!" to WCP!!!!
Dale

Posts:444

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07/03/2014 10:06 AM
The only unfriendly thing I've said to someone on a bike (other than during a race ), was to some dope on a multi-use trail with the headphone blasting and totally oblivious to her hogging the left side of the trail and generally being a menace to everyone. I tried to pass and coughed, whistled, called out, yelled then finally squeezed by while reaching over to yank the earbud out of the left ear.
Nick A

Posts:98

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07/03/2014 10:06 AM
First, I haven't been riding at all lately. But when I do, and I'm on the bike paths, I always go nice and slow, and give a lot of room to folks who don't look very comfortable on their bike, especially kids. When parents see me in spandex mode and get nervous, semi-shouting at their kids to move over, etc., I give the kids a thumbs up, and tell them they're doing a great job.

When I see people walking their 8 pound dogs on thirty foot long, 1/8" diameter leashes, I want to effing scream. I ain't Gandhi.

Nick
jmdirt

Posts:657

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07/03/2014 10:23 AM
This is similar to a thread we had last month. I try to be friendly to everyone on the trail (biker, hiker, runner, fat, skinny, pretty, ugly, young, old, slow, fast...) because I represent my sponsor and my sport as much as myself. I want people to consider shopping at my LBS, I want them to think that mountain bikers are good people, and I want them to enjoy their day on the trails. As far as encouraging people, even if you don't do it to be nice, remember that those people spend money in our sport.

Last week a guy in the group I rode with asked me (in a smart ars, rhetorical way) "do you greet everyone?"
vtguy

Posts:222

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07/03/2014 11:28 AM
+1 jmdirt
jacques_anquetil

Posts:202

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07/03/2014 11:39 AM
i used to get annoyed with a riding buddy who would emit a cheerful "heeellllllooooo!" to many and all random cyclists on the path. but after trying it out a few time i am starting to see the wisdom; it seems to make the day better for everyone involved.
Orange Crush

Posts:1149

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07/03/2014 12:03 PM
I know some really fit overweight people and some really out of shape skinny ones. Best not to have any preconceived notions or be snarky. Beyond that, as CK said, its ultimately everyone's own responsibility to do what's best for them.
Pin0Q0

Posts:229

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07/03/2014 02:24 PM
Yeah this is all nice and dandy and it’s great that we all want to do better things and treat others better, that was my New Year’s resolution years ago. I respect everyone until they give me a reason. Sure I offer to help with mechanical, and have used my cartridge (carry 2) for their flat or anything else they may need, after all I’ve been saved quite a few times by fellow bikers who expected nothing in return. But unfortunately I have not mastered tolerating ignorance and stupidity whether it’s on or off the bike. I tried for many years to make excuses for them…., maybe they are this or maybe they had that, but finally came to realization that there are no excuses for stupid. When you see an oncoming biker and you are riding double and refuse to move your fat a$$ over or drop back because you are too busy flapping your jaw, that’s when I have to yell something sarcastic. I consider it as giving free education.
jrt1045

Posts:357

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07/03/2014 03:51 PM
always encourage the Freds. Generally speaking, roadies are a broken social group - both emotionally and socially. So I go out of my way to greet other people on the road just to get my giggles from their reaction - many times it is somewhere between disgust and indifference. Many do not appreciate it, its pretty visible
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