Cookson says an Armstrong admission would be meaningless without truthful details
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Monday, January 07, 2013

Cookson says an Armstrong admission would be meaningless without truthful details

by VeloNation Press at 11:24 AM EST   comments
Categories: Pro Cycling, Doping
 
“Let’s not have any false accusations or innuendos”

Lance armstrongBritish Cycling president Brian Cookson has given his thoughts about the rumoured possibility of an admission of career-long doping by Lance Armstrong, saying that if the Texan does speak out, that he must do so truthfully and without malice.

“Who knows what Armstrong’s motivation is now, but I hope that when he tells the truth, he tells the whole truth, the whole story and if he feels the need to name names, then do so,” he told the Telegraph.

“If he feels the need to give evidence against other people, then do so, but let’s not have any false accusations or innuendos. Let’s have the full truth, a full disclosure of everything.”

According to the New York Times, unnamed sources have said that Armstrong has told anti-doping officials and associates that he might consider opening up about doping use if he can return to competition.

The World Anti Doping Agency’s director general David Howman has said that he would be open to discussions, but didn’t say what, if any, concessions could be given. “Never say never. … I'm prepared to listen to anybody,” he told ESPN.com.

Cookson said that an admission might help the sport to move forward, although he admitted that he finds it hard to grasp reasons why the Texan might change his stance now.

“The sport has moved on over the doping issue, but I think there is an agreement internationally that we need to heal the sores of the past,” he said. “If we have Lance Armstrong finally confessing then we all welcome that, and let’s move on.

“I find it difficult to understand what his motivation is after denying and denying again after all these years, and then finally giving up and wanting to tell the truth. Armstrong’s confession is a matter for him and his conscience.”

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