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My new rig
Last Post 04/18/2014 08:45 PM by SideBy Side. 23 Replies.
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Author Messages
Inferno7

Posts:278

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04/17/2014 08:31 AM
Amazing machine. Nothing like a new ride!
Keith Richards

Posts:755

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04/17/2014 08:58 AM
Humbling...you are a hard dude SideBySide.
----- It is his word versus ours. We like our word. We like where we stand and we like our credibility."--Lance Armstrong.
SideBySide

Posts:189

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04/17/2014 12:27 PM
No, you just do what you have to do. If you love cars, you find a way to race them. If you love cycling, you find a way to enjoy that. I firmly believe that anyone here would do the same, because of the personalities we have. The people who would sit around and do nothing would have been doing that before.
Sweet Milk

Posts:93

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04/18/2014 11:30 AM
I am a complete ignoramus when it comes to this, so please bear with me - Looking at the picture it occurred to me that the cranks on the handcycles that I have seen are always in-phase (is that the reason for being called side by side?) rather than 180 degrees out of phase as with road bikes - are there people that prefer another set-up? Is the reason that otherwise the upper body would have to rock too much? Does this set-up allow you to use your core muscles efficiently instead of primarily having to use your arm strength?

SideBySide

Posts:189

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04/18/2014 01:27 PM
The name SideBySide came from the configuration of my wheelchair wheels, not the handcycle.

I "think" the primary reasons for the cranks being together is for balance and to give an even strong stroke. If they were on opposite sides, your left shoulder would be pulled forward at the bottom of the stroke while your right was pushed back at the top. The bulk of the power, in my limited experience so far, is on the push stroke. All racing chairs that I have seen use this configuration, even for people with high function.
79pmooney

Posts:1189

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04/18/2014 02:27 PM
Does anyone use a strap across their shoulders or torso to allow a stronger pull? Functioning a little like a toestrap?

Ben
Sweet Milk

Posts:93

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04/18/2014 04:01 PM
Thanks for the answers SideBySide. Looking further at the picture it also occurs to me that it must be difficult to engineer a good steering geometry - I assume that the basket like loops near the front wheel is where your feet are placed? So when you steer your legs are moved over? I can imagine that going downhill at speed coming into a turn may be an, let's say, exhilarating experience...

In any case - it looks like a blast to ride.
Sweet Milk

Posts:93

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04/18/2014 05:09 PM
@79pmooney: since apparently the push stroke is where most power is generated a strap would hinder more than help. But then again, I may be full of it...
SideBySide

Posts:189

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04/18/2014 08:45 PM
I think people lean back to reduce drag, then the weight of the torso is enough to get a good pull stroke. It is a surprisingly smooth stroke.

The turning radius sucks, in all cycles, AFAIK, It takes most of a two lane road.
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